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Last updated: May 1st, 2006

Picture of the Day
May 2006

Click on each image to see a larger version.
Most pictures are available in even higher resolution. Please let me know if you want one or more in a higher resolution.
Most pictures are copyright 2006-8, Michael Thomsen. Please do not use any picture without written permission.
Contact me here: http://mtech.dk/thomsen/contact.php


May 1st - The original 18" telescope, which is soon going to be moved to the museum. This is where the Mass-Dimm instrument I'm setting up is going to be installed.

May 2nd - Night over Palomar

May 3rd - Early morning at Palomar

May 4th - Fortunately we were over the clouds this night

May 5th - Haze over LA. According to the locals this is not real smog!

May 6th - The laser guided star in action at Palomar. This is how it actually looks, the picture has not been manipulated.
Image copyright Palomar Observatory.

May 7th - Binary star imaged before and after applying adaptive optics. Image copyright Palomar Observatory.

May 8th - Drawing of the 200" telescope.
Image copyright Palomar Observatory.

May 9th - Apparently there still is a market for cars made of fake wood.

May 10th - View from the mountains towards Burbank.

May 11th - The 200" during construction.
Image copyright Palomar Observatory.

May 12th - Transportation of the 200" mirror up the mountain.
Image copyright Palomar Observatory.

May 13th - View of the beam transportation system inside the dome while propagating the laser guided star.
Image copyright Palomar Observatory.

May 14th - Planetary Nebula M27, discovered in 1764 by Charles Messier. Planetary nebulae have nothing to do with planets. They are formed from by a shell of gas which was ejected from a star (like our sun) late in its life.
Image copyright Palomar Observatory.

May 15th - Inspiration point, it's currently in the middle of no-where, but earlier a tourist rail road took people up in this area.

May 16th - Not a very good visibility today.

May 17th - Mount Lowe, as seen from the vicinity of Inspiration Point.

May 18th - Inspiration Point is behind the ridge.

May 19th - A couple of trees (pun intended).

May 20th - Another view of the laser guided star in action.
Image copyright Palomar Observatory.

May 21st - NGC 2392, known as Clown face Nebula or Eskimo Nebula for obvious reasons. Discovered in 1787 by William Herschel. It's about 5000 light years away.
Image copyright Palomar Observatory.

May 22nd -

May 23th - Antennas at Mount Wilson.

May 24th - View from Mount Wilson towards LA.

May 25th - Mount Wilson Observatory.

May 26th - Bird on a pole.

May 27th - The telescopes at Palomar mountain.
From left to right: 48", Palomar Testbed Interferometer (just to the left of the 200"), 200", 18", and the 60".
Image copyright Palomar Observatory.

May 28th - The Ring Nebula, M57. Planetary nebulae are important objects in astronomy because they play a crucial role in the chemical evolution of the galaxy, returning material to the interstellar medium which has been enriched in heavy elements and other products (such as carbon, nitrogen, oxygen and calcium) by nucleosynthesis.
Image copyright Palomar Observatory.

May 29th - This is the Flaming Cannon, that MIT stole. Here it is on it's way back. As you can see it's quite large.
Image copyright Caltech students.

May 30th - The Caltech students were kind enough to leave a replica. Image copyright Caltech students.

May 31st - Just a nice palm tree near Caltech.